U.S. Politics Dec. 6, 2011

An ‘Iron Hand’ Is No Substitute For Democracy

The experience of the former Soviet Union’s struggles to make the transition to a more open society holds an important lesson for the Middle East, a region in which the democratic tide still swells despite panicked opposition from some and the efforts of others to regulate its tempo.

U.S. Politics Dec. 6, 2011

Illegal Immigration: Gaps Between and Within Parties

The public continues to support tough measures to crack down on illegal immigration, but also a path to citizenship for those in the country illegally.

Global Dec. 5, 2011

Confidence in Democracy and Capitalism Wanes in Former Soviet Union

Two decades after the Soviet Union’s collapse, Russians, Ukrainians, and Lithuanians are unhappy with the direction of their countries and disillusioned with the state of their politics. Enthusiasm for democracy and capitalism has waned considerably and most believe the changes that have taken place have had a negative impact on many aspects of public life.

Hispanic Dec. 1, 2011

Unauthorized Immigrants: Length of Residency, Patterns of Parenthood

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s recent endorsement of a proposal to create a path for unauthorized immigrants to gain legal status if they have lived in the country for a long period of time has prompted renewed interest in the characteristics of this population. An analysis finds that nearly two-thirds of the 10.2 million unauthorized adult immigrants have lived in the U.S. for at least ten years.

U.S. Politics Dec. 1, 2011

Modest Rise in Number Saying There Is “Solid Evidence” of Global Warming

There has been a modest increase over the past two years in the percentage of Americans who say there is solid evidence of global warming, although substantially fewer Americans say there is solid evidence of global warming than did so from 2006 to 2008.

Nov. 23, 2011

The Military – Civilian Gap: Fewer Family Connections

While most Americans today have family members who once served or are currently serving in the armed forces, a new Pew Research Center study finds there is a large gap on this measure between older and younger adults.

U.S. Politics Nov. 23, 2011

Romney’s Mormon Faith Likely a Factor in Primaries, Not in a General Election

About half of all voters, and 60% of evangelical Republicans, know that Mitt Romney is a Mormon. The former Massachusetts governor’s religion has implications for his nomination run, but not for the general election should he be nominated as his party’s standard bearer.

Religion Nov. 21, 2011

Lobbying for the Faithful

The number of organizations engaged in religious lobbying or religion-related advocacy in Washington, D.C. has increased roughly fivefold in the past four decades, from fewer than 40 in 1970 to more than 200 today. A new study by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life examines the agenda, strategy, religious affiliation and structure of 212 religious advocacy groups operating in the nation’s capital.

U.S. Politics Nov. 19, 2011

More Now Disagree with Tea Party – Even in Tea Party Districts

Since the 2010 midterm elections, the Tea Party has not only lost support nationwide, but also in the congressional districts represented by members of the House Tea Party Caucus. And this year, the image of the Republican Party has declined even more sharply in these GOP-controlled districts than across the country at large.

Global Nov. 17, 2011

The American-Western European Values Gap

Americans’ values differ significantly from those of their Western Europeans counterparts. Although this gap is long-standing, current polling shows Americans coming closer to Europeans in not seeing their culture as superior to others.