U.S. Politics Oct. 17, 2008

Poll Power

Though by no means a perfect instrument, polls make it possible for more opinions, held by a broader and more representative range of citizens, to be known to the government and thus, potentially, heeded.

U.S. Politics Oct. 16, 2008

Campaign Seen As Increasingly Negative

The campaign received more media coverage than the financial crisis for the first time in a month, but nearly two-thirds of Americans (63%) list either economic conditions or the stock market drop as the single news story they followed more closely than any other last week.

Religion Oct. 16, 2008

Ten Years of U.S. Efforts to Promote Religious Freedom

A scholar describes the controversy surrounding the passage of the International Religious Freedom Act in 1998 and discusses its impact worldwide.

Media & News Oct. 15, 2008

Campaign Tactics and Tone Trump Economy in Media Narratives

For the first time in a month, the election generated more coverage than the financial crisis and almost one-third of that coverage was connected to the increasingly harsh tone of the campaign.

U.S. Politics Oct. 15, 2008

Public Worried But Not Panicked About Economy

Americans are concerned about the nation’s economic problems and they register the lowest level of national satisfaction ever measured in a Pew survey. But there is little indication that the nation’s financial crisis has triggered public panic or despair.

U.S. Politics Oct. 15, 2008

Who Knows News? What You Read or View Matters, but Not Your Politics

Where you turn for news may say a lot about how much you actually know. So who scores higher on a political knowledge quiz? Hardball or Hannity & Colmes? Newspapers or network news? Stewart or Colbert?

Media & News Oct. 10, 2008

Blaming the Messenger: A Continuum of Press Condemnation

From Jefferson to Palin, politicians of the left and right have blamed the media for public discontent with their policies, politics or personal behavior.

U.S. Politics Oct. 9, 2008

Beat the Press: Many Say Press has Been Too Tough on Sarah Palin

While strong majorities feel the press has been fair to John McCain, Barack Obama and Joe Biden, as many people say the press has been too tough on the governor of Alaska (38%) as say it has been fair (38%). Republicans overwhelmingly believe the press has been too hard on Palin (63%).

Media & News Oct. 7, 2008

Did Campaign Coverage Move off the Economy? You Betcha!

Though the economic crisis dominated general news coverage, the vice presidential debate drove the campaign narrative as Sarah Palin received the most attention of the four candidates.

Global Oct. 7, 2008

Trickle-Down Global Economics: World Already Saw U.S. Influence as Negative

Well before the current economic crisis circled the globe, publics worldwide were well aware that U.S. economic conditions affected their own economies. Most — including the U.S. itself — viewed that influence in a negative light.