U.S. Politics Aug. 23, 2007

A Study in Contrasts: Clinton and Guiliani

Sen. Hillary Clinton is by far the most popular presidential candidate among her own party’s voters, but among the general public, she has one of the lowest favorable ratings of the leading candidates. In sharp contrast, the front-running Republican candidate, Rudy Giuliani, evokes relatively modest enthusiasm from the GOP base, but is as broadly popular with all voters as any candidate in either party.

U.S. Politics Aug. 22, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

In the second of two parts, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience news preferences to examine news interest across decades and describe how the public’s news interests have changed — or not changed — over different news eras.

Hispanic Aug. 21, 2007

1995-2005: Foreign-Born Latinos Make Progress on Wages

Foreign-born Latino workers made notable progress between 1995 and 2005 when ranked by hourly wage. The proportion of foreign-born Latino workers in the lowest quintile of the wage distribution decreased to 36% from 42% while many workers moved into the middle quintiles.

Religion Aug. 21, 2007

Religion and the Presidential Vote: A Tale of Two Gaps

An analysis of national exit polls from 2004 shows there is not one but two religion gaps — one based on religious affiliation and the other based on frequency of attendance at worship services. How did the gaps manifest themselves in the 2004 election and what are the possible implications for 2008?

Media & News Aug. 20, 2007

Presidential Campaign Overtakes Iraq as Media’s Top Story

The 2008 Presidential campaign — with its crowded field and accelerated timetable — emerged as the leading story in the American news media in the second quarter of 2007, supplanting the policy debate over Iraq.

Pew Research Center Aug. 20, 2007

Democrats Debate in Iowa

Sunday morning all eight Democratic candidates for president met at Drake University in Iowa. How did their views on issues ranging from Iraq to money in politics match up with public opinion data?

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

Despite dramatic structural changes in the news media since the 1980s, the interests of news audiences have changed very little over the past several decades. Disaster News and Money News have been at the top of the charts throughout, while Tabloid News and Foreign News have been at the bottom. In this first of two reports, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience preferences taken by the PRC (and predecessor organizations) since 1986.

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Presidential Campaign Isn’t Making a Good First Impression

The 2008 presidential campaign already seems to be wearing out its welcome with many Americans. A 52% majority of the public offers a negative assessment of the early-blooming campaign and just one-in-five has a kind thing to say.

Pew Research Center Aug. 10, 2007

Democrats Address Gay Community

On Thursday night six Democratic presidential candidates came together for a debate on issues important to the gay community. Candidates took on issues from gay marriage to “don’t ask don’t tell” and addressed a party whose rank-and-file hold ambivalent positions on some issues of concern to gays.

U.S. Politics Aug. 9, 2007

Small Audience For Murdoch’s Dow Jones Deal, Few Expect Change

A majority of Americans who are following the story of publisher Rupert Murdoch’s purchase of the Wall Street Journal say the sale will have little or no impact on the quality of the newspaper.