Hispanic Oct. 18, 2006

The Changing Landscape of American Public Education

Public school enrollment in the U.S. has risen sharply since the early 1990s, with Hispanic students accounting for about two-thirds of the increase. The growth has triggered a surge in new school construction, but two-thirds of the new facilities are not serving Hispanic students.

Religion Oct. 18, 2006

In Pursuit of Values Voters: Religion’s Role in the 2006 Election

In a Pew Forum roundtable conversation, Forum senior fellow John Green and two prominent journalists speculate that it will be difficult for the Republican Party to mobilize evangelicals to go to the polls in great numbers next month. They also discuss challenges faced by the Democratic Party in appealing to this segment of the electorate.

Hispanic Oct. 17, 2006

Who Are the Immigrants?

This Pew Hispanic Center statistical profile provides a detailed look at the foreign-born population in the United States.

With a foreign-born population of over 35 million, who are these immigrants and what do we know about them?

Hispanic Oct. 12, 2006

From 200 Million to 300 Million: The Numbers behind Population Growth

The U.S. population will reach 300 million some time this month. This fact sheet presents an analysis, by race/ethnicity and nativity, of the 100 million people who were added to the population since 1966-67. In addition, the fact sheet breaks down the U.S. population, again by race/ethnicity and nativity, when it was 200 million and at the 300 million mark.

U.S. Politics Oct. 11, 2006

November Turnout May Be High

Unlike the past three mid-term election campaigns, Democrats are more enthusiastic than Republicans about voting this year.

Religion Oct. 11, 2006

God’s Country?

In recent years, evangelicals have helped to put conservatives at the helm of U.S. foreign policy, while focusing their energies on a few issues including support for Israel and promotion of religious freedom abroad. Now, they are showing interest in global warming and other issues traditionally seen as liberal.

Religion Oct. 11, 2006

The Vatican and Islam

Pope Benedict XVI is scheduled to visit Turkey on Nov. 28-30, a trip that has already attracted exceptionally close attention because of the pope’s use of an inflammatory 14th-century quote about Islam during a September speech in Regensburg, Germany. Pew Forum Senior Editor Robert Ruby examines the issues and challenges in interviews with George Weigel, an expert on Catholicism, and John Esposito, a scholar of Islam.

U.S. Politics Oct. 11, 2006

Growing Number of Liberal Democrats

About one-third of Democratic voters now describe themselves as liberal, an increase since 2000, when just one-in-four Democrats self-identified with the “L-word.” Meantime, some 41% of Democrats now call themselves moderate and 23% say they are conservatives.

Pew Research Center Oct. 5, 2006

Nerds Gone Wild

Ceremonies at Harvard honor scientists who discovered why woodpeckers don’t get headaches, why people dislike the sound of fingernails scraping on a blackboard and how many photos are needed to ensure that no one in the picture has their eyes closed. Plus declining teacher quality and the latest research into shop-a-holics.

U.S. Politics Oct. 5, 2006

Iraq Looms Large in a Nationalized Election

A new poll finds dismay about U.S. military action in Iraq at its highest level since the war began and many voters say the issue will be primary in their ballot decisions come November. Resignation of Rep. Foley has little impact so far.