Pew Research CenterJune 16, 2017

Q&A: Pew Research Center’s president on key issues in U.S. polling

Read a Q&A with Michael Dimock, president of Pew Research Center, on recent developments in public opinion polling and what lies ahead.

U.S. PoliticsMay 26, 2017

Few Americans support cuts to most government programs, including Medicaid

Americans tend not to favor budget cuts when asked about specific areas being affected, including Medicaid.

Pew Research CenterApril 27, 2017

Q&A: Using Google search data to study public interest in the Flint water crisis

Read an interview with Director of Journalism Research Amy Mitchell, who helped author the study.

U.S. PoliticsApril 18, 2017

Many Americans haven’t heard of the House Freedom Caucus

About four-in-ten adults say they have heard “nothing at all” about the Freedom Caucus, a group of conservative Republican lawmakers in the House.

Pew Research CenterApril 10, 2017

Immigration offenses make up a growing share of federal arrests

Federal law enforcement agencies are making more arrests for immigration-related offenses and fewer arrests for other types of offenses – including drug, property and gun crimes – than they were a decade ago.

March 28, 2017

Federal criminal prosecutions fall to lowest level in nearly two decades

Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges against 77,152 defendants in fiscal year 2016. That’s a decline of 25% since fiscal 2011.

March 1, 2017

Most violent and property crimes in the U.S. go unsolved

In 2015, 47% of the violent crimes and 35% of the property crimes tracked by the Bureau of Justice Statistics were reported to police.

February 21, 2017

5 facts about crime in the U.S.

Government data show that violent and property crime rates have both fallen in the long term – but official estimates vary widely, and public perceptions often don’t align with the data. Here are five key facts on crime.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 8, 2017

Younger Supreme Court appointees stay on the bench longer, but there are plenty of exceptions

Justices who were younger than 45 when they took the oath of office served an average of 21.6 years on the court; those who were ages 45 to 49 served an average of 19.4 years.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 2, 2017

The changing face of Congress in 5 charts

Apart from its political makeup and policy objectives, the new Congress differs from prior ones in other ways, including its demographics.