Gretchen Livingston is a Senior Researcher at the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project. Her primary areas of interest include immigrant adaptation, gender, social networks and family structure. She earned her Ph.D. in Demography and Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, and prior to joining the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project she was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Princeton University Office of Population Research. Read full bio

Dec. 20, 2013

The link between parental leave and the gender pay gap

It turns out that countries that offer more liberal parental leave policies tend to have higher wage gaps among men and women ages 30-34, according to analyses by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Dec. 12, 2013

Among 38 nations, U.S. is the outlier when it comes to paid parental leave

Estonia offers about two years of paid leave for new mothers, and Hungary and Lithuania offer one-and-a-half years or more. What about the U.S.?

Nov. 27, 2013

The links between education, marriage and parenting

New data released this week from the U.S. Census Bureau reaffirm the strong linkage between educational attainment and the marital status and living arrangements of parents of minor children

Nov. 15, 2013

Will the end of China’s one-child policy shift its boy-girl ratio?

While son preference remains a strong cultural norm in China, it will be interesting to see if the loosening of the one-child policy will lead to an increasing share of baby girls in the country.

Sep. 24, 2013

The odds that you will give birth to a boy or girl depend on where in the world you live

Sep. 6, 2013

Chart of the Week: Big drop in birth rate may be leveling off

The release of 2012 statistics on the U.S. birth rates indicates a flattening of the sharp decline in fertility that accompanied the Great Recession.

Jul. 3, 2013

Birth rates hit record low for those under 25, still on the rise for those 40+

The overall U.S. birth rate declined to an all-time low in 2011. Birth rates reached an all-time low among women in their teens and early 20s, while rising to the highest level in four decades among women in their early 40s.