Fact TankMay 5, 2016

Who are the Democratic superdelegates?

The 700+ unpledged party leaders and elected officials are mostly white, mostly men and mostly Hillary Clinton supporters.

Fact TankApril 14, 2016

Candidates who don’t win on first convention ballot usually go on to lose

In 11 of the 18 conventions since the Civil War that went more than one ballot, the first-ballot leader ended up losing the nomination to someone else.

Fact TankApril 13, 2016

High-income Americans pay most income taxes, but enough to be ‘fair’?

By design, wealthier Americans pay most of the nation’s total individual income taxes.

Fact TankApril 7, 2016

Cost-of-living disparities within states complicate minimum-wage debate

The cost of living can vary widely not just from state to state but within individual states, which can make setting an appropriate minimum wage more difficult.

Fact TankApril 6, 2016

The biggest U.S. tax breaks

The hundreds of exemptions, deductions and other breaks embedded in the tax code will cost the federal government more than $1.3 trillion this fiscal year.

Fact TankMarch 18, 2016

5 facts about Twitter at age 10

Five facts about Twitter, as the microblogging platform marks its 10th anniversary.

Fact TankMarch 11, 2016

This year’s GOP presidential battle isn’t the first – or even the deepest – party divide

Both major U.S. political parties have a long history of splits, splinters and other schisms.

Fact TankMarch 8, 2016

So far, turnout in this year’s primaries rivals 2008 record

So far this year, Republican primaries are experiencing record turnouts, much as voting in Democratic primaries surged in 2008. But the longer-term trend in primary turnout has been down.

Fact TankFebruary 26, 2016

Long Supreme Court vacancies used to be more common

If Senate Republicans stick with their declared intention to not consider anyone President Obama might nominate to replace Antonin Scalia, his seat on the Supreme Court likely would remain vacant for a year or more. That would be the longest vacancy on the court for nearly five decades, but by no means the longest ever in U.S. history. In fact, for much of the 19th century it was not uncommon for Supreme Court seats to be unoccupied for months – or, in a few cases, years – at a time.

Fact TankFebruary 24, 2016

Scalia’s Supreme Court vacancy draws much public interest, unlike past open seats

Such high levels of interest and engagement weren’t common in past Supreme Court nomination battles.