May 21, 2014

In honor of Fact Tank’s 1st birthday, a data quiz just for you

A year ago today, the Pew Research Center launched Fact Tank, our very own data┬áblog. Why? Because even though Pew Research publishes lots of reports, we still have a lot of data that are relevant to the things people are talking about in the news, online and with their friends, and we wanted to be […]

May 19, 2014

32 years ago, experts foresaw much of today’s digital world

In 1982, researchers studying the impact of nascent electronic-information services predicted much of what has since become commonplace.

May 16, 2014

Chart of the Week: Who really drinks the most?

The countries with the highest per-capita alcohol consumption don’t, as a rule, have the heaviest drinkers. Those tend to be in countries where alcohol is forbidden or strongly discouraged.

May 15, 2014

By many measures, more borrowers struggling with student-loan payments

More people are having trouble keeping up with their student-loan payments than in years past, several studies show.

May 14, 2014

More than a decade later, 9/11 attacks continue to resonate with Americans

As the National September 11 Memorial Museum prepares to open, a look at how Americans view the 2001 attacks and their legacy for the country.

May 9, 2014

Chart of the Week: Climate change is already here

Average temperatures have risen over the past century in nearly every part of the U.S. outside the Deep South.

May 6, 2014

Americans still sour on the economy despite falling unemployment

Americans’ assessment of the economy appears to be at odds with official unemployment statistics. But looking more deeply at job openings, hires and quits can help explain the disconnect.

May 2, 2014

Chart of the Week: How America’s poor can still be rich in stuff

While most manufactured goods are considerably cheaper than they were three decades ago, many key services are much more expensive — contributing to the paradox of greater material abundance among even poor Americans.

Apr 30, 2014

Botched execution in Oklahoma renews death-penalty debate

Oklahoma’s botched execution of Clayton Lockett has renewed debate about how, and whether, the U.S. should impose the death penalty.

Apr 30, 2014

Long-term unemployment is still high; new research suggests geography could be one reason

New research finds that living near where there are jobs significantly reduces the amount of time it takes unemployed jobseekers to find work, and that the effect is especially significant for blacks, women and older workers.