GlobalJune 27, 2017

People’s views of their national economies don’t always square with data

Many Europeans, Japanese and Americans feel better today about their nations’ economies than they did before the financial crisis, according to a new global survey by Pew Research Center. But those public sentiments aren’t always aligned with a nation’s actual economic performance.

Pew Research CenterJune 7, 2017

U.S. job openings at record high levels

In April, there were more than 6 million nonfarm job openings, according to the federal government’s Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey.

U.S. PoliticsJune 1, 2017

Trump’s nominees have already faced a large number of cloture votes

The president has been slow to nominate people to fill key posts, and most of those he has named have had to overcome the cloture hurdle before being confirmed.

U.S. PoliticsMay 15, 2017

U.S. trails most developed countries in voter turnout

Among the 35 OECD countries, the U.S. ranks 28th in terms of turnout among the voting-age population, but fourth in terms of turnout among registered voters.

Pew Research CenterMay 4, 2017

Q&A: Political polls and the 2016 election

Courtney Kennedy of Pew Research Center, who chaired survey researchers organization AAPOR’s task force on political polling in the 2016 U.S. elections, discuss the group’s findings and recommendations.

U.S. PoliticsApril 4, 2017

What does the federal government spend your tax dollars on? Social insurance programs, mostly

From Social Security to national parks, a look at long-range trends in federal outlays relative to the U.S. economy

March 23, 2017

Access to paid family leave varies widely across employers, industries

Americans generally support paid family and medical leave, according to a new Pew Research Center survey, but relatively few workers have access to it. Access to paid leave varies considerably by industry, type of employer and employer’s size.

March 17, 2017

The fading of the green: Fewer Americans identify as Irish

The ranks of Americans who trace their ancestry back to Ireland – long one of the most prominent subgroups in American society – are slowly declining.

March 16, 2017

Immigrants don’t make up a majority of workers in any U.S. industry

Immigrants made up 17.2% of the total U.S. workforce in 2014, or about 27 million workers. Private households were the biggest immigrant-employing “industry,” followed by textile, apparel and leather manufacturers and the farm sector.

March 7, 2017

What the unemployment rate does – and doesn’t – say about the economy

Although the unemployment rate gets most of the attention, the government’s monthly jobs report contains lots of other data that, properly interpreted, can provide a fuller picture of the U.S. economy.