D’Vera Cohn is a senior writer and editor at Pew Research Center. She was a Washington Post reporter for 21 years, mainly writing about demographics, and was the newspaper’s lead reporter for the 2000 Census. After leaving the newspaper in 2006, she served as a consultant and freelance writer for the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project, Brookings Institution and Population Reference Bureau. She also has advised the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism on demographic topics, and has spoken at national journalism conferences about how reporters can make use of demographic data in stories. A graduate of Bryn Mawr College, she is a former Nieman Fellow. Read full bio

Fact TankApril 28, 2016

Census Bureau hopes to use data from other government agencies in 2020

Anyone who has filed a U.S. tax return, applied for a Social Security number or signed up for Medicare has given personal data to the government. So when the Census Bureau counts the American public, can it use the information that other federal agencies have already collected?

Fact TankApril 8, 2016

From multiracial children to gender identity, what some demographers are studying now

The nation’s largest annual demography conference, the Population Association of America meeting, featured new research on topics including couples who live in separate homes, children of multiracial couples, transgender Americans, immigration law enforcement and how climate change affects migration.

Fact TankMarch 31, 2016

10 demographic trends that are shaping the U.S. and the world

We gathered key facts for this year’s Population Association of America (PAA) meeting.

Fact TankFebruary 24, 2016

For 2020, Census Bureau plans to trade paper responses for digital ones

The 2020 census could be the first in which most Americans are counted over the internet.

Fact TankFebruary 3, 2016

Homeland Security produces first estimate of foreign visitors to U.S. who overstay deadline to leave

Out of 45 million U.S. arrivals by air and sea whose tourist or business visas expired in fiscal 2015, the agency estimates that about 416,500 people were still in the country this year.

Fact TankOctober 5, 2015

Future immigration will change the face of America by 2065

A snapshot of the U.S. in 2065 would show a nation that has 117 million more people than today, with no racial or ethnic majority group taking the place of today’s white majority.

Fact TankSeptember 30, 2015

How U.S. immigration laws and rules have changed through history

The United States began regulating immigration soon after it won independence from Great Britain, and the laws since enacted have reflected the politics and migrant flows of the times. We looked at key immigration laws from 1790 to 2014.

Fact TankSeptember 11, 2015

Number of babies born in U.S. to unauthorized immigrants declines

About 295,000 babies were born to unauthorized-immigrant parents in 2013, making up 8% of the 3.9 million U.S. births that year. This was down from a peak of 370,000 in 2007.

Fact TankJune 24, 2015

How many same-sex married couples in the U.S.? Maybe 170,000

A new research paper suggests that the number of married same-sex couples in the United States in 2013 may have been much lower than the Census Bureau’s initial estimate for that year.

Fact TankJune 18, 2015

Census considers new approach to asking about race – by not using the term at all

Instead, the new census questionnaire may tell people to check the “categories” that describe them.